Tag Archives: trust

Want To Be A Great Leader? Build Trust First!

Why Building Trust Makes Leaders More Successful

Building trust is hard, but there’s an unspoken goodwill supporting your success.

There is an amazing amount of trust, tradition, and protocol that surround the inauguration of the President and Vice President of the United States of America. The symbols of power are ever-present. Former Presidents, elected leadership of both major political parties, the United States Supreme Court Justices, Cabinet Secretaries and nominees, elected Representatives and Senators, Diplomatic Corp, Governors, Joint Chiefs of Staff, Honor Guards, military bands, motorcades, security teams, and government staff.

As the winner of the general election, the American people have placed their faith and trust in new leaders.

It’s a good parallel for you as a leader especially if you’re new to your post or working to overcome an organization failure. There’s an unspoken and perhaps unseen goodwill encouraging you in your leadership position. It emanates brightly from the moment you accept the post. Your job, is to keep that goodwill alive and healthy by building trust. New leaders sometimes overlook the enormous power of goodwill and the trust they have coming into a leadership role. That is a mistake.

Savvy leaders know that building trust is key to their own success and that of the organization they lead. Here are five things I’ve learned about trust in my leadership career.

Trust Requires Risk Taking

Whenever I have accepted a new leadership position, one of my first actions is meeting with the entire staff and then individually with every staff member starting with the person on the lowest rung of the organization. Oftentimes, that person is the janitor, receptionist or stock room clerk. It doesn’t matter. I want them to have the same opportunity as everyone else in the firm to see the new boss up close. It’s important I get to know them and share a bit about myself.  Finally, I want them to see they are an important part of the enterprise and more importantly that I see them.

Savvy leaders know that building trust is key to their own success and that of the organization they lead.

Trust, Like Respect, Must Be Earned.

It’s also true that your place as a leader will come with a loan of goodwill–funded by the “trust bank”–to get you started on your way. Don’t squander it. Expect your words to be parsed for meaning and your actions watched closely. One of my unofficial jobs as an association  Chief Operating Officer was explaining what our CEO really meant.
Trust and Leadership

His staff meeting edicts, shared news, or strategic pronouncements often met with much confusion among team members. Absent real trust, I became the “CEO whisperer” to staff, clarifying edicts and making meaning from his words. Being obtuse is not helpful to building trust with your team. As Warren Buffet reminds us, “It takes 20 years to build a reputation and five minutes to ruin it.”

When it comes to leading, your team, your members, your Boards, Committees, and stakeholders need to meet you.

Trust Comes From Being Authentic

I’m often asked for reading recommendations for leaders. Who’s the best to read? Peter Drucker? Tom Peters? Rosabeth Moss Kanter? Jim McGregor? Steve Covey? Bill George?  My answer is always the same. Carl Rogers. His book “On Becoming a Person” first published in 1961 provides exceptional leadership insight and guidance.
Written as a treatise for psychotherapists and counselors, Rogers explores the value and meaning of being authentic and the simple power of being oneself. You and your team benefit enormously from a willingness to lead with your best self. The comedian Chris Rock tells a dating joke that illustrates the point. “When you go out on that first date, you’re not meeting me, you’re meeting my representative.” When it comes to leading, your team, your members, your Boards, Committees, and stakeholders need to meet you.

Keeping Your Word Creates Trust

The greatest tool to engender trust, is to keep your word. My greatest leadership mishaps have come from not doing what I said I would. There’s never any malice behind my inaction. Oftentimes, I changed my mind after agreeing to something because upon further thought, it seemed like an unworkable or bad idea.

Saying “no” is almost always a better choice, if you cannot see a clear path to success.

If I agreed to do something under pressure, knowing the work needed to get done, the results were awful. Typically, after making these commitments I found my work schedule overloaded or worse still that I lacked the essential skills for achieving the goal. Poor choices. Worse results. Here’s what every CEO and leader has learned.

Trust, Leadership, Followers
Changing your mind after the fact isn’t a crime, but your trustworthiness will take a hit, especially if you delay communicating your change of heart. Saying “no” is almost always a better choice, if you cannot see a clear path to success. Sure you can take the occasional flyer, but not at the risk of you being viewed as untrustworthy. Don’t do it.

One the ways you take the lead here is to model the behavior you expect from your team.

When Trust Is Nowhere To Be Found

How can I trust you? We’ve all been let down by someone. The team member who misses deadlines.  The one who sows dissent and discomfort among the team. Those who lie, dodge, diffuse, and deflect responsibility. It’s all part of the human condition. But it’s not okay. When it comes to disruption save it for your latest innovations and product launches.

One the ways you take the lead here is to model the behavior you expect from your team.  When you sense a team member is being less than truthful, ask more questions. Dig in. Clarify the issues as you see it and ask them to do the same. Avoid blaming, shaming or shifting responsibility. Use “I”messages, like those developed by clinical psychologist Thomas Gordon famous for his Leadership and Parenting Effectiveness (P.E.T./L.E.T.) Training workshops.

Building trust is challenging work. Keeping it requires you to keep a critical eye on your own behavior and actions. It’s probably worth remembering Albert Einstein‘s thoughtful assessment. “Whoever is careless with the truth in small matters cannot be trusted with important matters.”

That Angry Moment.

American voters had their angry moment this week.  They turned the U.S. House of Representatives over to the Republican Party.  It was an object lesson in the failure of leadership.  This was not a partisan moment.  It was a moment of supreme despair and frustration.  If the blameworthy Republicans drove the car into the ditch—as President Obama said so often on the campaign trail—it became his administration’s failure to get it out of the ditch and back on the road to jobs that doomed Democrats in the mid-term elections.  Nobody can argue the ditch wasn’t deep or that economic traction was illusive. Some like Eugene Robinson of the Washington Post saw voter’s behavior as irrational.  In his editorial The Spoiled-brat American Electorate Robinson wrote “The American people are acting like a bunch of spoiled brats.”  When it comes to the massive challenges facing our nation he writes, “They want somebody to make it all better. Now.”  Patience it seems is not on the national menu.  Frustration, well that’s another matter.

Whenever either political party has held the full majority in both houses of Congress, they have more often than not failed to hear the electorate, ridden rough-shod over their opponents, filibustered one another’s efforts and in the end violated the inherent privileges of leadership.  Simply put, every leader gets paid for results. Period. When individuals believe their sole purpose is to obstruct the other side’s plans, they forfeit their right to lead, violating the most basic tenets of trust, teamwork and responsibility of calling people to service along the way.

That’s also what makes it such a critical cautionary tale.  If so many capable and talented politicians can blindly stumble into this leadership maelstrom, how can we possibly avoid it?  Sure it’s a punchline to an easy joke, but it’s also a daunting question all leaders need to consider.  History is replete with leaders who have gotten it so very wrong and thankfully a few so very right.  Perspective in these matters is easily worth a 100 IQ points.